Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Alonzo King


Alonzo King has been called a visionary choreographer, who is altering the way we look at ballet. King calls his works "thought structures" created by the manipulation of energies that exist in matter through laws, which govern the shapes and movement directions of everything that exists. Named as a choreographer with "astonishing originality" by the New York Times, Alonzo King LINES Ballet has been guided by his unique artistic vision since 1982. King has works in the repertories of the Royal Swedish Ballet, Frankfurt Ballet, Ballet Bejart, Les Ballets de Monte-Carlo, Joffrey Ballet, Alvin Ailey, Hong Kong Ballet, North Carolina Dance Theatre, Hubbard Street Dance Chicago and many others. He has collaborated with distinguished visual artis, musicians, and composers across the globe including legendary jazz saxophonist Pharaoh Sanders, Hamza al Din, Pawel Szymanski, Jason Moran, Charles Lloyd, Mezzo soprano Maya Lahyani, architect Chris Haas, and tabla master Zakir Hussain. Renowned for his skill as a teacher, King was honored with the Lifetime Achievement Award by the Corps de Ballet International Teacher Conference in 2012. An Internationally acclaimed guest ballet master, his training philosophy undergrids the educational programming at the Alonzo King LINES Dance Center of San Francisco, which includes the pre-professional Training Program, Summer Program, and the BFA Program at Dominican University of California.

Monday, March 5, 2018

Susan Travers a woman in French Foreign Legion


Susan Travers was born into a wealthy English family and spent most of her youth in southern France. After she finished school, she led the life of a socialite, travelling around the world as a semi-professional tennis player.

When World War 2 broke out, she wanted to contribute to the war effort. Being able to drive a car, she ended up as an ambulance driver with the French Expeditionary Force on their way to Finland. After the German invasion of Denmark and Norway, she escaped back to England, where she joined de Gaulle’s Free French. During the Syrian campaign, she worked as a driver for a medical officer of the 13th Demi-Brigade of the Légion Étrangère. From there, she accompanied the Foreign Legion to Dahomey and the Congo to finally end up in the Western Desert campaign in North Africa.

Having formed friendly relations with officers of the Foreign Legion, she was assigned as the driver of General Pierre Koenig. Over and over again, she proved her skills at the steering wheel, chauffeuring Koenig when he led the so-called ‘Jock Columns’, two- or three-day long reconnaissance missions with a motorized convoy of troop transports, cannons and Bren Carriers. In her autobiography, she describes the dangers of such missions: “More than once we nearly got caught and I had to drive the general to safety, fleeing from enemy fire at great speed or hiding in a dried-out wadi as the German or Italian tanks rolled by.”

When Koenig was tasked to occupy and hold Bir Hakeim, a desolate former oasis in the middle of nowhere, Travers refused to leave the area with the other women and stayed for what was to become one of the most dramatic actions of the Desert War. The attack was planned by Rommel, who estimated that it would take about 15 minutes to overrun the position of the 1st Free French Brigade. In the end, the defenders held out for almost four weeks against attacks from Italian and German forces. When the situation finally became untenable and ammunition was running out, Koenig decided to make a daring sortie and lead his troops through the German cordon back to the British lines.

On 10 June, Travers drove Koenig’s staff car, her trusty Ford Utility, with Koenig and Lieutenant Colonel Dimitri Amilakhvari of the Foreign Legion in the passenger seats. She headed through mine fields and German gun emplacements, dodging potholes, mines and bullets. “Avoiding a car burning fiercely in front of me, I roared on across the minefield, heading straight for the tracer fire, not having time to think or even be afraid. In fact, by this time I was exhilarated. It was an amazing feeling, going as fast as I could in the dark towards what looked like a mass display of beautifully coloured fireworks dancing towards me, bringing what seemed like almost certain death. This was what I had come for – to feel what it was like to be a man, in the very heat of battle. […] The stalled convoy, seeing us get through, followed my lead, jerking their engines into life again. I drove at the tracer fire ahead of us as if the car were the bow of a great ship, parting a sea of bullets.”

When Travers later inspected her car, she found 11 bullet holes and severe shrapnel damage. Koenig’s manoeuvre succeeded: He managed to get 2.500 of his men out of the German encirclement and into the safety of the British positions. The Battle of Bir Hakeim was hailed as a great coup and signalled the combat readiness of the Free French Forces. Susan Travers went on to work as a driver for the rest of the war, conducting ambulances, trucks and even a tractor for anti-tank guns. “The vehicle was much easier to handle, but its cargo meant it was far more dangerous to drive. It was my job to manoeuvre it into position, unhook it, turn round and go back for the next. There was a fair amount of shelling whenever I appeared because the Germans were very keen to knock me out before I got the cannon into position.”

After the war, Travers officially joined the French Foreign Legion and served as an Adjutant-Chef in Vietnam. She was decorated with the Légion d’honneur, Croix de Guerre and Médaille Militaire.

Saturday, March 3, 2018

Harmonia Rosales


Harmonia Rosales believes in creating artwork with meaning--meaning with impact, moving people to see the world differently and to be guided by that new vision. Based in Chicago, her inspiration arises from living life as a woman of color. Her art is born out of a combination of her love for history, thirst for endless new knowledge, and dedication to social action. In refining her work, she has been able to shape a unique perspective built on the foundation of an appreciation of traditional expression and form, with structure and story that creates a bold new contemporary counter narrative-on the elements of the story, as well as the elements of the process of storytelling. Art is her weapon in the ongoing battle against indifference and inaction. It forms the basis of resistance. ​

Friday, January 19, 2018

Columbia Sloop


Columbia, a fin keel sloop, was designed and built in 1898-9 by Nathanael Herreshoff and the Herreshoff Manufacturing Company for owners J. Pierpont Morgan and Edwin Dennison Morgan of the New York Yacht Club. She was the third successful defender built by Herreshoff. Columbia had a nickel steel frame, a tobin bronze hull, and a steel mast (later replaced with one of Oregon pine.) Columbia was launched on June 10, 1899. She easily won the elimination trials against the rebuilt former defender, Defender. Skippered by Charlie Barr, she won all three races against the British defender, Shamrock in the 1899 America's Cup. Notably, Hope Goddard Iselin was the only female on the crew, serving as afterguard. Columbia was selected again in 1901 to defend the Cup, and again under the command of Charlie Barr, won all three races against Shamrock II. In 1903 Columbia was refitted with the hope of being selected for a third time, but she was badly beaten in the selection trials by the yacht Reliance. Columbia was broken up in 1915 at City Island and sold to Henry A. Hitner and Sons of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania for scrap.

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Safari 1978 Porsche 911 SC


In the late 1960s and early 1970s, the Porsche 911 was a benchmark in European rally competitions, with a win at the Monte Carlo Rally in 1968, 1969 and 1970! In detail, this is a 1978 Porsche 911 SC, whose engine comes from a newer 911 Carrera 3.2. Its 6-cylinder flat develops 230 hp and receives a manual transmission, whose reports have been shortened to offer better times. This model is equipped with 215/85 off-road wheels equipped with 16-inch fuchs and a limited slip differential.

Thursday, December 14, 2017

46Works’ Moto Guzzi V7 custom by Ritmo Sereno


Via : The Magnificent BIKE EXIF

Shiro Nakajima is best known as the man who started up Ritmo Sereno the Tokyo shop famous for its immaculate BMW and Moto Guzzi customs.

Friday, December 8, 2017

Kawasaki Z900RS Cafe


Following Moto Guzzi´s lead in presenting the V85 vintage inspired or Ducati with his Scrambler, Kawasaki have presented the Z900RS Cafe, a retro-modern roadster that pays tribute to the iconic 1970s Z1.

Monday, November 27, 2017

1961 Chevrolet Corphibian


In 1961, Chevrolet introduced the Corvair 95 Greenbriar van and Rampside pickup. Using a 95-inch wheelbase, both the van and pickup expanded on the Corvair model range creating, in a sense, an entire new car line comprised of a sedan, wagon, coupe, convertible, van and pickup. All were equipped with flat-6 cylinder engines and either a manual transmission or Powerglide automatic and like so many inexpensive cars of the era, could be equipped exactly as the customer wanted. But one Corvair that largely went unnoticed was the Corphibian Prototype. Built by Chevrolet Engineering with the Hulten-Holm Company of Pontiac, Michigan, the Corphibian is an amphibious vehicle based on the Rampside Pickup truly escalating an already capable vehicle. Featuring an extended body and fiberglass hull, the concept would allow users the opportunity to enjoy both terrestrial and aquatic travel, not dissimilar to the Amphicar Model 770 launched the same year. Unlike the Amphicar, however, Chevrolet only built one Corphibian, and this is it.Via :